Dr. O. L. Davis, Jr.

Dr. O.L. Davis Jr., held the Catherine Mae Parker Centennial Professorship in Curriculum and Instruction.  He served as president of Kappa Delta Pi from 1980-1982. In 1994, Professor Davis was elected to membership in the Society’s Laureate Chapter of distinguished educators. His awards include:

  • Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contributions to Curriculum Studies from the American Educational Research Association, 1994
  • Distinguished Alumnus of the University of North Texas, 1999
  • Citation for Exemplary Research in Social Studies Education from the National Council for Social Studies
  • Distinguished Alumnus Award/Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 2004
  • Dean Distinguished Faculty Award from the University of Texas, 2005

As a faculty member at the University of Texas, Austin, he taught graduate courses and seminars in curriculum development (practice and theory), curriculum history, curriculum policy analysis, and an advanced seminar in curriculum studies. He was also the editor of the Journal of Curriculum and Supervision, the world’ largest circulation journal in the curriculum and supervision fields.

Dr. Davis’s contributions to education span half a century and represent involvement at every level, from working as teacher and principal in Texas schools to being an award-winning professor and serving as Associate Secretary for the nonprofit Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Dr. Davis received international acclaim for his work in analyzing teacher practices as well as his intensive study of the impact of war on curriculum in U. S. schools during the past two centuries.

Dr. Davis received international acclaim for his work in analyzing teacher practices as well as his intensive study of the impact of war on curriculum in U.S. schools during the past century and a half.  He also examined the beginning of the high school accreditation movement in Texas and researched the United States’ efforts to improve the education of African Americans in the South during the first half of the 20th century.